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Entries in #CPA (1)

Saturday
Jul202013

CEREBRAL PALSY BEER SKIRTS CONTROVERSY

The Swedes have long been known for their inclusive, humanistic approach to those from all walks of ilfe, but they've courted controversy with their latest move.

The Gothenburg Cooperative for Independent Living (GIL) has created a beer to get people talking about physical and mental disabilities.

The Cerebral Palsy Ale, known as the CPA, is a hybrized Indian and American pale ale and its label is even a cartoon image of a female cerebral palsy sufferer in a wheelchair.

The social idea behind the CPA is to highlight the Gothenburg's lack of disabled access in its bars, restaurants and nightclubs, which GIL argues has not improved since a 2010 law that ordered easier access and disabled toilets.

So the CPA is being used as a reward, with only 220 litres of it brewed at first, but that has been bumped up to a total of over 1800 litres.

Anders Westgerd of GIL told the BBC: “We like to cause a stir and make people react and create feelings.

“Disabled people are marginalised in media and hence you have to do something non-traditional to create feelings and make people angry.”

It will remain a limited edition beer, though, as GIL isn't geared up to be a full-time brewer.

It's not their first big attempt to raise awareness through controversy, though, as they've also had campaigns that included a “retard doll” (CP-docken in Swedish), with the motto: “treat her like a real retard”.

In an earlier campagin, they planted 30 fridges around Gothenburg, home of conservative favourite, Volvo, covered with slogans to promote inclusiveness of handicapped people.

GIL said that the topic of disability, like the fridges, were not “sexy” and usually brushed under the carpet or tucked away out of sight.