Search
LOGIN
BECOME A BEERIO

Want to stay up to date with all the latest happenings at the beer drinker's culture hub that is Beeriosity? Just click here to create your own Beerio account.  

BEST BEERS
WORST BEERS
FAQ

Got a question? Consult our ever evolving FAQ here.

TWITTER
Friday
Aug172012

KRISTALLWEIZEN/KRISTALLWEISS

Like a standard Hefeweiss, but filtered (hence, Crystal White). Removing the dead yeast cells means they also remove the natural carbonation, so the natural gases escape and they then have to be artificially fizzed.

If it’s too big a leap from mainstream beers to white beers, this may be a good middle step. The best of them is probably the Weihenstephaner brewery’s version though other Bavarian brewers boast excellent examples, too.

Like all wheat beers, though, it's not quite all wheat. Most wheat beers use at least 50% barleymalt as the base. 

See all kristallweiss

Friday
Aug172012

LAGER

Another catch all, this time for darker, bottom-fermented beers that have been cool-cellared and are less bitter than a Pilsner. The name, though, is often mixed around and used for top-fermented beers as well.

Called "Lager" because they were originally brewed in Bavaria's winter months and stored in cool caves and cellars - laagering in German.

See all lagers

Friday
Aug172012

LAMBIC

About as far removed from an IPA as you can imagine. Not hoppy and not bitter, their unique flavours come about chiefly because they use only dried, aged hops.

That leaves the beer without the hoppy taste or bitterness of fresh hops, but does let the beer benefit from hops’ preserving traits. Plenty of other northern-European beer styles out there masquerade as unique, but are all technically Lambic beers at heart.

See all lambics

Monday
Dec312012

LOW CARB BEERS

Essentially Pilsners that have been filtered and had plenty of their carbohydrates removed from them, but are then boosted to maintain typical alcohol levels. 

See all low carb beers

Friday
Aug172012

MARZEN

Another Bavarian style and the seasonal polar opposite of the Oktoberfest brew, but essentially the same thing, with one important difference. All Bavarian beers were once brewed in winter and the last ones to out of the pipe were the Marzens (March).

They were cold stored (lagered) in caves throughout the summer and re-emerged in October (hence Oktoberfest bier), so were higher in hops and malt to survive their internment - which most of them still do very successfully.

While it’s available all year round today, at least Spaten adheres to the old ways and releases its Marzen/Oktoberfest in the third quarter.  

See all Marzens

Thursday
Aug232012

PALE ALE

A top fermented beer style, where the word "pale" designates the colour of the beer, though some of them aren't even pale these days.

See all pale ales

Friday
Aug172012

PILSNER/PILS/PILSENER

If you’re one of the great unwashed beer swillers who think Pilsners are for pussies, we’ve got news for you: most mainstream beers are Pilsners. If you don’t see a particular style written on the label (and, often, even if you do), you’re probably quaffing a Pilsner. The list is long and includes: Budweiser, Beck’s, Heineken, Tsingtao, Snow Beer, Asahi, Singha, Kingfisher, Amstel, Grolsch and even Kirin. Even most light and low-calorie beers are adulterated Pilsners.

No such beer existed 200 years ago, so its world domination must have an underlying reason that combines ease of manufacture with drinking appeal.

We’ll use “Pilsner” if for no other reason that it rewards Pilsner-Urquell for inventing it. Well, sort of.

The other Pilsners, the citizens of Pilzen, in today’s Czech Republic, had revolted at the inconsistency of the beer they were being plied with, so the ruling class built a new brewery and hired a 22-year-old German brewer from neighbouring Bavaria to solve the problem.

Pale malts had just come into being, so he slung them in with local hops and the low-mineral water of the local river and then lagered it all for the season and out came Pils/Pilsner/Pilzner/Pilsener.

Bavaria’s Helles beers are essentially the same style as Pilsner, though a proper Pilsner is more bitter than a Helles.

See all Pilsners

Friday
Aug172012

PORTER

First spotted in and around London around 300 years ago, Porters are thick, black and high in calories.

Named after the people who drank them (what we would now call, umm, truck drivers), it found its way around the world (including, significantly, Ireland) and there was an even stronger version, named Stout Porter. That one is now just known as Stout.

See all porters

Friday
Aug172012

RAUCHBIER

Bavaria’s smoky beer, a characteristic that comes from drying the malt over a fire. Once upon a time, all beer was made this way. Fortunately, modern kilns have moved the game on. Yet another acquired taste for the adventurous.

See all rauchbier

Friday
Aug172012

SAHTI

One we’ve yet to locate one of these oddball Finnish beers in export markets, but a Sahti is a barleymalt beer that starts life in wooden barrels and then is strained through juniper branches. It doesn’t survive on the shelf for long (Finns not being noted for their temperance, a looming use-by date has never been a historical concern) and is rarely exported.

Friday
Aug172012

SCHWARZBIER

When’s a Black beer not a black beer? When it’s a Dunkel, of course. Dunkels and Scwarzbiers are closely related, but not the same. Schwarzbiers look like stouts but don’t have the weight or toastiness of stouts/porters and use Pilsner malts as their base.

See all schwarzbier

Friday
Aug172012

SCOTCH

Perhaps the most hit-and-miss style out there. We’ve found a good one and several so horrid you might think it would better if they didn’t exist. They’re supposed to be a low-bitter pale ale, but you’ll end up bitter if you pay for one of the bad ones. Be careful.

See all Scotches 

Friday
Aug172012

STOUT

See porter, because these are essentially a stronger version of the porter style.

See all stouts

Friday
Aug172012

TRAPPIST ALES

Basically the same as Abbey Ales, but not quite. Only six Belgian Trappist monasteries still brew and market their own beer and, by Belgian law, they are the only breweries allowed to call their Ales Trappist Ales. (FYI, they are Achel, Chimay, Orval, Rochefort, Westmalle and Westvleteren.)

Think that’s clear? Well, there is one other Trappist monastery brewing beer that doesn’t fall under the evil eye of Belgian law. It’s Tilburg brewery in The Netherlands

See all Trappist ales

Friday
Aug172012

WEISSBIER

See Weizenbier. It’s a top-fermented ale up to 50 percent wheatmalt. They usually taste a bit fruity and sweet, though some of them are maltier.

See all weissbiers

Page 1 2